Tuesday, 24 August 2010

Some Interesting Facts About Guitar

The guitar is a stringed musical instrument. Customarily, it was hung with six adaptable material lengths kept under strain. Today, a good guitar not just comes in four, seven, eight, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, and eighteen string checks, but on the other hand is perceived as an essential instrument in different music styles, for example, Flamenco, Jazz, and Pop. Perused on to know fascinating certainties and the history about guitar.

The guitar is a standard stringed instrument that is an indispensable piece of different musical styles. It is a typical sight in shows advancing Blues, Country, Rock, and Mariachi exhibitions over the globe. This conventional solo established instrument has old roots, dating as far back as 4,000 years prior! For the individuals who came in late, a guitar is characterized as a fussed neck instrument, fitted with a level wooden soundboard, a few ribs and a back with incurved sides. The present day guitar can be played acoustically, or with the backing of an enhancer. The musical tones are either created by adjusted string vibrations or electronic control. Today, this musical instrument affects music societies around the globe, particularly since the presentation of the electric guitars in the 1930s.

Fascinating Facts 

  • The precursors of the advanced guitar can be followed back to the stringed instruments played crosswise over Central Asia and India, in antiquated times. 
  • The most seasoned iconographic representation of the strumming instrument is a 3,000-year-old cutting of a Hittite or antiquated Anatolian versifier playing the instrument. 
  • The instrument is accepted to have plummeted from the cithara conveyed to Hispania by the Romans, in 40 CE. 
  • The different references to the guitar in old times included guitarra, gitarre, guitare, qitara, cithara, kithara, and sihtar. 
  • Generally, they were built with blends of different woods. The strings were made of creature gut. 
  • The musical instrument has a notice in records kept up by the Moors, Viking invasions, and in conventional Norse carvings. 
  • Measurement models of the cutting edge stringed instrument were set up by Antonio Torres Jurado, somewhere around 1817 and 1892. 

Guitar Design Facts 

  • The different brands of guitars include PRS, Dean, Gretsch, Gibson, Ibanez, Jackson, Schecter, and Fender and Martin. 
  • Established guitars are normally hung with nylon strings. They have a wide, level neck for slightest string obstruction with scales and arpeggios. 
  • The Yepes 10-string guitar displays four resonators that work as one with each of the 12 chromatic notes, to upgrade and adjust vibrancy. 
  • Archtop guitars are cut in a bend instead of the conventional level shape. They are outfitted with attractive pickups and level injury strings. 
  • Electric guitars are fitted with electromagnetic pickups to change over string vibrations into electrical signs. These are then bolstered into an enhancer and adjusted through vacuum tubes. 
  • Guitars can be developed for left-and right-gave players. The components are adjusted in like manner, to improve the progression and tonal expressions. 
  • Renaissance and Baroque guitars are generally utilized as mood instruments. 
  • Guitars are composed, developed, and repaired by luthiers. 
  • An acoustic guitar radiates sound by means of a soundboard, regularly a wooden mount on the front of the configuration. The subcategories of acoustic guitars incorporate established and flamenco renditions. 
  • Level top or steel-string guitars have fortified necks that are smaller with a solid auxiliary outline. They are a basic piece of Folk, Jazz, Country, Bluegrass, Blues, and Pop music. 

Guitar Essentials: An Overview 

  • The essential guitar outline regularly involves: 
  • Headstock, toward the end of the guitar neck. 
  • Neck, containing fusses, tuners, fretboard, headstock, and truss bar. 
  • Nut, a little piece of any hard material at the headstock-fretboard crossroads. 
  • Fretboard or fingerboard. 
  • Worries, metal strips implanted on the fretboard. 
  • Truss pole, a metal bar along within the neck. 
  • Strings produced using metal or polymer materials. 
  • Trims, visual components along the outside surface. 

Guitar embellishments involve: 

  • Capotasto, to open up string pitch. 
  • Slides, to produce the glissando impact. 
  • Plectrum, to "pick" the strings. 
The guitar is an adaptable musical instrument. It empowers the structure of complex harmonies and exact sound. It is a well known decision of artists committed to various music classifications for the musical embellishments it advances, for example, slides, twists, and sounds.

Wednesday, 9 September 2009

The Possibility of More, Part IV - Student Responses

By midnight Sunday, 9/13/09, there should be student responses explaining their projects and what they'll be committing to in class. So, instead of reading it from me, please go to my American Lit blog and see their wonderful ideas for yourself. I also attached the full version of my "The Possibility of More" essay.

Sunday, 6 September 2009

The Possibility of More, Part III: Lighting the Spark

My biggest fear is that the easiest part is now done and the difficult work lay ahead. I know I want to keep open communication between the students and myself. I’m planning to have the students write a memo to me this week via our class blog (the fourth week of class) giving their interpretation of what was decided in our one on one conference. That way, I can easily see if there’s a disconnect between what I’m hearing and what they’re hearing. Likewise, I want to keep an open dialogue about the project so that they feel comfortable about it and begin working toward putting it together – I don’t want them to look at the project as so overwhelming that they do not know where to start. For many, I can see this being their biggest hold-up. I’m asking them to do something that they have never been asked to do before. I’m asking them to look at themselves and their education in a new light. Some embrace this challenge and they have told me in their conferences they wish every class would be approached this way, they wish learning was the focus instead of grades, they are looking forward to taking some risks, and they love the freedom of learning without boundaries. Others, though, thrive on the structure of being told how an assignment should be done. I’m asking this type of student to take a big step out of their comfort zone in the hope they’ll realize the potential that lies within them if they listen to their own ideas and give themselves the freedom to take risks. I hope two more conferences with each student will make this easier for all of us. What has also been encouraging is the number of colleagues who have commented on how impressed they are with the depth of the conferences and the questions I’m asking my students to consider. No one else is giving all their students A’s yet, but at least I have them curious and pondering.

Another uncertainty I’m feeling is what to do with those students who have chosen not to set-up a conference? If I have no idea what their Final Project will look like, how will I know if it’s a stretch for them or if they’re merely going through the motions? Also, if a student has done little or nothing all semester, but cranks out a decent final, is that still an A? I think I’ll have a difficult time giving an A to someone who I see as taking advantage of the system – do I still have to give that A then? Will the parents and administration demand the A that was promised on the first day of class?

Additionally, I need to find the balance between focusing on American Literature as “normal” and making the Final Project the focus. What do I want them to take away from the class? How will I ensure that they’ll still be successful in more challenging upper-level classes? Am I making this too easy on them since they do not have to “earn” their grade?

Yeah, I feel overwhelmed, but it’s an excited overwhelmed. I don’t want to fall into the pattern of teaching as usual. I want to challenge my students to look beyond the four walls of the classroom and into a future only they can determine. I want them to make connections between literature and life by going out and actually living the life they choose (not the life chosen by their family or friends). I want them to begin seeing the connections that are made among all of their classes; see that there’s connectivity to their education and to realize that learning is not compartmentalized. I want them to embrace new challenges and be open to taking risks. I want them to be alive to the possibilities that surround them and for them to see themselves as unique contributors to the world. And, more than anything, I want to light a spark that encourages life-long learning and an inner search to figure out who they are and what they truly believe.

The Possibility of More, Part II: Go Big

Now, I’m fully committed to this idea. If I’d have kept this to myself, I probably could have found a way to weasel out of this; but, fortunately, I shared the idea. I guess I’m looking at it as my grand experiment – can a group of high school juniors and a couple of seniors rise to this challenge? Can they recognize what kind of opportunity they’re being given? One huge benefit working in my favor is the fact that our school has a motivated student population. With American Lit being a college prep class and over 92% of our graduating students going on to colleges and universities, I don’t have to worry about many behavioral problems in this class.

Even with an inspired group, I knew if I wanted this to work, I would need to keep in contact with the students individually to help them talk through ideas, answer questions, ease concerns and stress, and monitor progress. So, after talking with my support team (see part I), I developed a worksheet and attached it to my webpage to give my students some things to think about. Concurrently, in the second class, I informed them that they need to meet with me once every six weeks (3 times during the semester). During the meetings, they needed to talk to me about their Final Project ideas; how they were going to show me they were “worthy” of an A grade while still thinking outside of the box; commitments and risks they were willing to take on; and contributions they would make to the class, the school, and eventually the world. I emphasized they needed to do more than just be a body in the classroom – they needed to leave a positive mark and begin to see themselves as important contributors. Likewise, I suggested they play to their strengths for the Final Project: do what they do well. (It took about 25 conferences before I began to see the error of this suggestion, but more on that later.) Moreover, I had to deal with week to week grades for sport eligibility and student/parent feedback. Karl Fisch and I played with this idea and figured the best way to go about this was to grade them as I normally would, using a traditional grading style and system. This would be a little bit of a game because they would still get an A for the semester. I would use traditional grading as feedback only – giving them an idea whether or not their quality of work matched my expectations. That way, by the end of the semester, they’d know the level of depth and craftsmanship I expected in their projects. Karl also helped me understand that these grades would help take pressure off of the Final Project because if a student does well all semester, but falls apart on the project he/she can still pass the class. Additionally, if a student does none of the assigned work over the course of the semester, but ultimately shows his/her learning in the final, then they will still get the A.

Conferences would occur before and after school and during off hours (we run a variable schedule and the students understand that off hours are to be used to meet with teachers, so this helps the conferencing process) beginning the next Monday and concluding Friday of the following week. Their responsibility was to look through the worksheet, schedule a conference that fit both our schedules, prepare their answers, and actually show up at their scheduled time (for many, if they can remember to make an appointment, showing up on time is the biggest challenge). With Back to School Night coming up on Wednesday of the second week of school, I knew I had to have conferences set-up and a plan of action in place. No one seems to worry quite as much as parents when their child is in the middle of a new process.

The best news, as I headed home Friday afternoon with one week of school completed, was how excited and positive I felt about American Lit and the new school year ahead (despite the fact that I have 210 students in all of my classes combined). I truly believed I was doing something beyond the normal classroom that would allow these students to grow not just as American Lit students, but, most importantly, as learners and human beings.

Also in class, we began by reading Emerson’s “Gifts” and “Self-Reliance” – two essays that invite the students to look at life differently. I challenged them with some of the most difficult reading they’ve ever done because I believe that Emerson (and later Thoreau) offers the perfect perspective to high school juniors – find your own unique place in the world, follow your personal dreams, and celebrate the fact that your own ideas are more important than anyone else’s. Once we discussed these in class and more people understood Emerson’s points, the students really seemed to enjoy the transcendental ideas – and a few recognized how well these ideas played into the overall idea of this semester-long experiment (even I’m not sure if this was pure coincidence or pure genius on my part).
Right at 7:00 Monday morning, I had my first conference and it was good – the young man had written down ideas on what he’d do for the project and had obviously thought through how getting an A this semester would impact him personally and as a student. Needless to say, I was encouraged. But, as with everything else, the later conferences at the beginning of the week were up and down. Some people had thought through exactly what they wanted to do and how it would look and others seemed to have put in no thought whatsoever. I was also trying to figure out what I truly wanted to learn from these conferences. More than anything, it was a great opportunity to get to know these students on a more individual level. Instead of looking at a sea of 32 faces in each of my two sections, this was an opportunity to find out each student’s individual passions and strengths as well as a chance to alleviate some stress and fear while clarifying individual questions. At Ray Hawthorne’s suggestion, I had a 3x5 note card for each kid and jotted down notes as we talked. Likewise, I found myself refining the questions I asked: by the end of the first week of conferences, I was asking mostly about what they wanted to do for their final and how they wanted it to look; what commitments they would make for our class in terms of participation and work effort; and what risks they were willing to take since they knew they could not fail. It became obvious to me that most were not ready to answer the “bigger” questions about how this will impact their futures and what contributions they planned to make in the community and the world. Therefore, I’ll save those questions for later – probably the end of the semester.

For me, it was wonderful to see the excitement that came from many of these conferences; how many students seemed to embrace this opportunity to follow their passion and show their learning in their own way without a pre-set rubric or series of expectations. I have students planning to do everything from poetry to essays, from original artwork to photography to choreographing a dance, from making an original film to writing a play to putting together a documentary, from writing an original rap song to making a rock video of original music, to writing the music for and performing in a string quartet. And, more often than not, it’s a combination of several of these elements. Needless to say, I was impressed by wealth of talent these students bring to school every day that, unfortunately, we get to witness far too infrequently.

For most, how they wanted to put the project together (even if they weren’t sure if their idea was feasible) was much easier to figure out than what they wanted to say. So, along the way I helped them break down the topics into three areas: 1) expand on an over-riding idea for American Lit: What is the American Dream? Or, what does it mean to be an American? 2) Take an idea from something we read this semester and expand upon it: self-reliance, non-conformity, etc… from Emerson. 3) Show what you’ve learned and/or how you’ve grown throughout the semester (I suggest they keep a journal of their ideas so they’re not sitting at home in December wondering what they read in August). Ultimately, I just wanted to make sure they connected their ideas to the class in some way.
My next challenge was Back to School night. Our school schedules it so that each class meets for 6 minutes before moving to the next class – eventually, over the course of 2 hours, a parent will make it to every one of their child’s teachers; making it a long day for teacher and parent alike. With only 6 minutes to convince parents I was experienced enough to handle the curriculum, serious about giving their student an A for the semester, and, at least somewhat sane. The parents from my 3rd hour class had several questions about how this would all work and one parent asked (not at all unkindly) if I was kind of flying by the seat of my pants with this experiment – I assured her I was. Others wondered if their kids would merely take advantage of this process and not learn anything along the way. This seemed to be the predominant theme until a father (who had previously remained silent) raised his hand and told the others that his daughter is typically a straight A student and she’s been talking about this American Lit class more than any others. Additionally, she’s planning to work harder in this class because she wants to be proud of her Final Project. I couldn’t have paid someone to do a better job of allaying the parents’ concerns (and if I had more than 6 minutes with this group, I would have found out who he was). My 5th hour American Lit parents were much less vocal and seemed to take things more in stride. I imagine by this time of night, most of them were on their last legs and just hoping for the night to end. My victory was that not a single parent saw this as a big negative. Surely, they have questions and concerns (though I’ve not received any emails so far), but not so much that they see no value in giving their student the freedom to take some risks.
It wasn’t until the Wednesday of the second week of conferences that I had my greatest “aha” moment. As I mentioned above, I wanted my students to play into their strengths in giving their Final Presentation. Yet, as I talked with more and more students, I realized that the last thing in the world I wanted them to do was play it safe for their final. If I’ve already told them they couldn’t fail, why not make the final the biggest risk of all? Why not attempt something they’re not sure they can pull off? Why not ask them to shoot for the stars? And, that’s just what I began to do. I implored them to go big and stretch themselves. To find something they’ve always wanted to do and have the guts to go after it. They have the definitive educational safety net in place and I don’t want them to waste that opportunity. So, last Friday I gave the class a little pep talk about taking advantage of this opportunity because they’ll probably never be in another class where they’re virtually guaranteed an A (they’ll only fail if they put little or no effort into the Final Project). I also wondered what they would be telling themselves if they had a chance to risk and they played it safe – are they going to live their entire lives afraid of their own success? Finally, I informed them that I was going to send this out to the world (I’m not sure anyone beyond my wife is actually reading this, but don’t tell my students please, Anne) and that they could either prove the notion that most high school students are apathetic (some true pessimists would probably say just pathetic) or show the world that they will rise to meet any challenge placed in front of them.

Thursday, 3 September 2009

The Possibility of More, part I

As with all crazy ideas, it occurred at approximately 3 a.m. – the time when you can convince yourself that just about anything will work. Usually, these ideas, when they hit the light of day, are seen for the frauds they are; but this one seemed to stick in my brain like a bad commercial jingle. What, you ask, is this half (to fully)-crazed idea? Of course, it’s to give all of my American Lit students (mostly juniors) an A for the semester on the very first day of class.

This idea came about when my wife, Anne Smith, suggested I read The Art of Possibility (Zander and Zander, 2000) for a class I was taking to get more credits and bump myself up the pay scale. One of the chapters that captured my attention was titled, “Giving an A.” The basic premise of this is that students will feel free to take risks and be more willing to challenge themselves if they do not have to worry what grade they’ll receive. My first thought, like I imagine most of yours will be, was every high school junior in the world will take full advantage of this opportunity by accepting the A and doing little or nothing in return. I will look like a complete fool to these students as they don’t even have to try to con me into giving them a better grade – they already have it. By this time in their educational lives, they know exactly how to “play school” and, if they so desire, work the system to give themselves every opportunity around to cajole, demand, and manipulate their way to a better grade. Yet, the idea still festered in my brain as we returned to school for teacher work days. And, after teaching American Lit since 1991, I was looking for a new spark to keep me motivated after a few years where I felt I was merely going through the motions. I wanted to look at class differently and get the students to do the same. I’m not trying to crank out English majors here; I’m trying to get students to find a passion for literature and to begin asking the big, important questions in life: What matters? What can I contribute to this world? What is my purpose? How can I find my own path to happiness and success?

With the encouragement of my wife, I stepped into the abyss on the first day of class. Honestly, I hadn’t thought this through completely and I wasn’t 100% sure I was even going to present this to the class until those fateful words spilled forth from my lips: “I have this idea that’s true madness and it scares me to death: I’ve decided to give you an A for the semester.” Looking around the room, the predominant emotion appeared to be shock. Since I enjoy teasing students as often as possible, former students thought this was a big joke. And, truly, how could they not? I’m guessing that at no time in their educational career have they just been given an A. They were trying to find the catch, the teacher’s fall-back where they’d really just get a grade like any other class. Fortunately, I didn’t have one to give them. All I wanted was for them to provide some sort of final product at the end of the semester that showed to me and the class as a whole that they were indeed an A student. Several students were concerned about what this final would look like and if there would be a rubric they could follow; I assured them I had no rubric – I didn’t want to confine their ideas to fit my mold.

After I’d already opened Pandora’s Box, I decided I might want to talk to some people who might be able to clarify this idea in my head. The first person I discussed this with is Karl Fisch, mild-mannered IT director by day, educational guru always. Surprisingly (but not really), he thought it was a great idea and helped me figure some logistics like how to figure grades along the way, what to do if someone does nothing all semester until the end, and what happens if someone completely bombs the final project. I knew that if I had Karl and Anne’s support (two educators I respect to no end), I must be on to something. Karl also suggested I talk with Ray Hawthorne, the school’s instructional coach and former master teacher in the building. Likewise, Ray was excited about this project and encouraged me to include more student feedback in order to allay fears and clarify questions. Now I had three highly respected professionals in my corner – for me, that was more than enough.

Friday, 2 November 2007

Frustration Abating

In my last blog I complained about my Film-Heroes students not following through with what I was trying to do. Happily, I've seen a change in the class!! The last student-led discussion we had, 22 of 28 students got involved in the hour. To me, that's an impressive amount. Even 2 of the students who did not get involved had their hand up at one time or another to answer a question, but someone else had a similar response. Likewise, the class blog has helped extend the conversation beyond the classroom walls and those students who did not participate in class did get on the blog and add their insights. Funny how 2 weeks (and a little talk with the class about how disappointed and disenfranchised I had become with the direction the class was taking) could change my (and hopefully their) perspective on what is possible in this class.

The other thing I wanted to comment upon was the overall generosity of the Arapahoe staff. Here's a group who gives and gives every day while not earning anywhere near top dollar. Yet, when I ask them to help me honor my dad by raising money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, close to 50% of the staff has contributed almost $1000 - I'm truly humbled by the outpouring of support. Likewise, I'm continually amazed by the caring and compassion demonstrated by the faculty and staff of our school - it's a blessing to work with people like this.

Wednesday, 17 October 2007

Time of Frustration

I'm getting to the point of frustration with my Film - Heroes class. I've been trying very hard to be more constructivist - students in charge of discussing different films of their choosing, open dialogue on direction of class, variety of activities to demonstrate student understanding (blogs, reaction papers, option for creative response, discussion), and student choice on other films. However, I feel as though I'm only reaching about 1/3 of the class most of the time. In fact, in my class of 31 (all juniors and seniors), I have 12 students with D's and F's. I love the ideas behind constructivism and student-centered learning, but I fear apathy runs too rampant. Many of these students don't seem to care at all about film - they merely saw the class as an easy grade (but are learning they're wrong) instead of a place to learn. Likewise, I wish I could do without grades, but right now even I feel the grade is the only thing that will motivate some of these low achievers to try harder. My hope is that word will get out that this is NOT a slacker class and the students I do get will be more willing to put in effort and will truly love film. But, at this point, I can only dream of that day.